FLR
After Restoration, Ansai, Shaanxi, Loess Plateau, China 2009 c John Liu

There are over 2 billion hectares of degraded and deforested land across the world - places that have lost their ability to provide nature's benefits to people and the planet.  Together we can restore them.

Forest Landscape Restoration (FLR) is a process that aims to regain ecological integrity and enhance human well being in deforested or degraded forest landscapes.

It involves people coming together to restore the function and productivity of degraded forest lands - through a variety of place-based interventions, including new tree plantings, managed natural regeneration, or improved land management.  FLR relies on active stakeholder engagement in the process and can accommodate a mosaic of different land uses, including agriculture, agroforestry, protected wildlife reserves, regenerated forests, managed plantations, and riverside plantings to protect waterways, just to name a few. 

FLR is a more than just planting trees – it is restoring a full landscape “forward” to meet present and future need and provide multiple benefits and accommodate multiple uses over time. Regenerated forests can buffer wildlife reserves, protect water supplies, or encourage agroforestry economies. FLR is placed based and fluid.  
 

Learn more about IUCN's approach to Forest Landscape Restoration

Latest news on Forest Landscape Restoration from IUCN


Gender and Restoration

Introducing On Gender and Restoration: A case study series

Planning landscape restoration often means evaluating forest health, water flows, or the availability of choice seedlings. It should also mean talking to women. …  

21 Jul 2014 | Blogs

“We can now begin to say which forest reserves are healthy and which are in a degraded state and may require restoration.” This is an early draft of an on-going effort to map the health of Ghana's important forest reserves.

IUCN Maps Health of Ghana’s Forest Reserves

You cannot manage what you have not measured. A new effort to map the health of Ghana’s important forest reserves is now underway. …  

17 Jul 2014 | Article

A new economic framework released by IUCN and partners can aid decision-making for restoration.

IUCN Releases An Economic Framework for Analyzing Forest Landscape Restoration Decisions

We depend on land for everything essential: food, water, shelter. When land loses its function and productivity - how should we go about restoring it? Where do we start? How shall we pay for it? A new framework for decision-making helps answer these questions, using the simple but powerful lens of economic analysis.   …  

16 Jul 2014 | News story

The Economics of Restoration

IUCN environmental economist Michael Verdone describes the role of economics in Forest Landscape Restoration planning and implementation.